PLEASE join me in vocal protest of this

http://news.yahoo.com/hsus-president-wayne-pacelle-announces-candidacy-board-seat-164649808.html

Please go and read this announcement.  It is fairly factual if totally in support of HSUS being involved in your meat supply system.  Apparently, HSUS already is part owner in Tyson Foods.

BUT you can just about count on bacon becoming less and less available and costs rising all the time, with HSUS messing in agriculture.

So, if you’re planning to embrace vegetarian living and growing your own garden, please dismiss this plea.

 

Otherwise, please sharpen your pencils and write to local newspapers and media, TO TYSON FOODS, and to anybody and everybody you can think of in protest of this vegan agenda, animal rights activism leader being involved in Tyson Food management.

Thank you for your consideration.

 

HAY! again

I’m not getting along with wordpress very well it seems.  We are not resolving very well incorporating pictures and text.  But we’ll try again.
The previous hay pictures shared show so-called “Big Round Bales” which are mixed alfalfa/grass usually, and mostly in this area of the country are from the first cutting of the field.  First cutting in the midwest is the most growthy, and becomes stemmy and coarse when it cannot be harvested in May, as has been the case in the last two springs, when most people could not get into the fields between rain showers until late June.  I plan to talk about the process of hay making and variations of baling next season.  I know that the process and quality of hay varies quite a bit around this big country.

We carry our round bales on the rear fork attachment of our little tractor, down the lane to one of our two groups of ponies (separated by size to make competition for feed more equal).   The round bales are stored outside by most people, and are wrapped by the hay equipment during the baling process, with plastic netting that helps shed rain/moisture as well as maintain the strength and shape of the bale for transport.  The bottom of the bale setting on the ground does get a layer of decay, but the animals simply avoid eating that part.  Some people “serve” the bale as it sits stored, so that the decayed part stays on the ground, but that can also cause concern depending on the group of animals and how they eat at the bale, because the core of the bale is the sweetest and best preserved, and some groups tend to eat the core first which can leave a shell that will collapse.  So we tip the bales up on end and get all the plastic off at the onset and this seems to work well for us.  It actually helps with the mini horse group to have a taller pony in the 13 hand range, to eat away from the top part and tear it apart for them.  But with about ten ponies chewing on a round bale, it lasts only about a week.  If you had only a couple horses it might not be very efficient to feed a big round bale because the weather could make much of it deteriorate once it was opened, before they could consume it.  With our group of bigger horses/ponies, also about 10 head, they finish off these round bales in just 3-4 days.

In the previous “HAY!” post the pictures showed our stallion, The Executive, in riding training.  I believe this was his 3rd ride, and we were very pleased that he accepted the scarey tractor and big bale monster going by without much fuss, heading on out to ride in the pasture.