2016 Foals Expected!

We used our mini gypsy development studs for herd sires starting in 2015.

Bellbottom July Sparkler 34″ tall sired by Wyatt an 11.3 hand tall purebred gypsy cob; and
Bellbottom Tuppenny Horse, ten hands tall 3/4 gypsy (mom is Hapenny) and sired by The Executive.

Look up their videos on my Chevreherd account on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/user/chevreherd

Mares at Chevreherd and expected foal dates:

Hapenny (1/2 sired by Cold Fusion), black bred to homozygous black pinto The Executive, due in March 2016
Dolly (1/2 sired by Toymakker), piebald x piebald Tuppenny due end of March
Sisters (1/2 by Cold Fusion) Angelica and Sera, piebald x piebald Tuppenny–April
BonBon, piebald x bay Sparky due April
Belladonna Cat Burglar (chestnut pinto x black pinto Tuppenny due May
Bandera Athenry, piebald x piebald Tuppenny due May
Stardust (1/2 by Wyatt) silver blanket appy x Tuppenny due June
Two AMHR mares one cremello and one silver dapple, due June by Tuppenny
Bellbottom M&M 3/4 (sire Executive mom QT by Toymakker) possibly in foal to bay pinto Wyatt son for late summer 2016
Bellbottom Cobbled Blossom 3/4 (Wyatt x Rosie by Cold Fusion) Bay x Blue pinto Tiny (1/2–sire Executive) – possibly in foal

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Gentle Family Pony

 

Bellbottom Farm is invested in the process of creating a new breed of miniature horse; a truly miniature gypsy horse that reflects the wonderful qualities of the full size wagon horse; sweet and gentle temperament—these horses want to interact with humans!  Beauty that is taken for granted….Intelligence that is so forgiving.  It makes them the perfect family horse.  Strong sturdy build that is also athletic.  Totally balanced animal inside and out.  The dream is possible!

Pasture pics 10/24/2012

Our gypsy cob stallion, The Executive, with a few of our mares (don’t forget if you click on a photo you can see a larger version).

Choosing a purely Cob Pony

Decided to take some photos today, it has been raining fairly often this past week and the horses have nothing but mud in their feed area, thankfully the cement lot is there to feed them treats!  They were sorely disappointed I did not offer anything tasty but only took pictures.  Remember, you can click on a photo to bring up the big size for viewing.

The big riding horses come first for attention but in the series of photos I want you to end up focusing on the cob ponies.  Everything under 14 hands is nothing but cob breeding….two black mares, weanling filly you can’t see much of, and two 2 year olds under 12 hands.

Which one appeals to you the most?

Bellbottom yearling colt signed up for National Clydesdale Sale!

We offer a superior quality gypsy cob yearling colt to the public during the National Clydesdale Sale in Indianna on April 28, 2012. He will be sold that day and online bidding is available. The website for more information is:

http://clydesusa.com/buy-nationalsale.php

We have several photos of this fine boy in our albums on facebook and I am happy to share them with anyone who asks.

We did make some attempt to get a video clip done this weekend:

Bellbottom Truffles

Truffles was my first gypsy cob filly investment.  I spent hours researching the gypsy horse breed ever gaining popularity in 2005.  I had actually first seen her older brother come up for sale on the Black Forest Shires and Gypsy Horses for sale site pages.  It was fun to go visit their for sale site pages because they had a real knack for taking very nice pictures of the horses they imported for resale from Britain to the United States.  They also would come up with several paragraph descriptions of each horse that made you feel like you knew it’s personality as an individual.  They had a real gift as horse dealers of finding high quality horses and reselling them that lasted for several years, making them responsible for a large number of the good gypsy horses that are present in the United States today.

Black Forest found Truffles’ parents for Grace Ranch (since dispersed) I believe around 2004.  Truffles daddy, Royal, is now the stallion most associated with Hope of Glory Gyspy Horse farm in Michigan.  Royal is a stunning individual who defines the terminology of “proper cob” as described by the Rom breeders.  I regret that I have never seen him hitched up to a colorful wagon travelling down the road, fulfilling what his family of horses was bred for.  Royal is a direct son of the famous black feathered cob that was extremely popular in England, Eddie Alcock’s Old Black Horse, and I believe that Royal was one of his last and best sons.  Grace Ranch was known for having some of the very best stock that was being imported from Britain, and Royal was the young shining star among several outstanding stallions.

Truffles momma was and is also a beautifully stunning gypsy horse of wide acclaim.  “Cassie” was imported from the Sid Harker herd along with the pivotal quality mare who came to be known as Babydoll at Black Forest.  I am sharing below a picture of “Cassie” previously known as Penny along with her pasture mate, Polly who became “Babydoll.”  This picture was on the home page of Black Forest for many years, representing the highest quality gypsy horses in the world.  Recently, I was able to ask Sid Harker’s family to verify Cassie’s sire, which they did, as Sid’s Good Stallion, a horse of great repute and some believe equal standing to the Old Black Horse, and especially known for producing excellent mares.  This was a thrilling moment for me, because I had always had the feeling that this must be true, and backs up my long-standing admiration for horses produced by Sid’s Good Stallion.  What a thrill to know I had the wonderful Truffles, verified to be from such royal lineage on both sides!   I already knew she was special, of course, but it has been hard at times to get pedigree information for these amazing quality horses.

Truffles has produced some wonderful colts for me so far; the 2011 colt is her best yet and is still available for sale.  He has been proven with a couple horse shows last fall to be a blue ribbon winner and champion colt.  Please call 309-594-2318 if you are interested in hearing more about this superb quality colt.

Meanwhile, Truffles was bred to The Executive for her 2012 baby and we hope, hope, hope for a filly this year!  If she has a colt, it will be available for sale as a weanling, and is sure to be a great investment for someone.  Both Truffles and The Executive (son of the also supremely famous Producer horse) have above-average conformation with structure for Cadillac movement, beautiful heads you just won’t find anywhere else, set correctly on NECKS that are refined and especially well set into the shoulder.  You are not going to find ANYWHERE I have seen with keeping track of what everybody has around the world in gyspy cobs; I repeat I find it easy to proclaim that this match-up has the best show horse necks that can be produced in a gypsy cob/vanner horse!

Enjoy the pictures:  (please note that if you hover your cursor over the individual photo, the horse’s name will appear)

New things I learned recently as to the horse slaughter subject

I was recently talking to a percheron horse breeder and found out that after the USA horse slaughter plants were closed, other countries lost a source for their market and they had to become creative to fill their needs. Japan, I was told, has invested in business in Canada and the draft horse people are really affected and worried about the fact that their youngstock is being purchased and taken to Canada for “finishing” as meat animals, instead of staying in the gene pool as prospects for hitches and breeding.

It is a fact that at this point, the slaughter business in Canada at any rate (I live in the northern half of the country) is targeting heavy muscled horses and prime healthy stock, some of which are well trained animals that simply are not being bid on by people in tighter financial times; they are not as interested in animals that are lightweight. With the ever increasing pressures that the animal rights people make to legislation (constantly ongoing—they are currently aggressive about getting rid of double decker haulers which are not in fact higher risk for travel and are of course more economical to use in these times of ever-increasing gas prices)…where in times past the slaughter market helped recycle horses that were poor, crippled, old; at this point the sales barns will not accept horses that are questionable as to value because they have been “stuck” thru this development of change in the market with horses abandoned at their facility, some of which have simply had to be disposed of, which no one wants to happen. Leaving the horse rescue people with a larger number of truly non-adoptable horses all the time.

Euthanasia and Slaughter

http://www.griggsdakota.com/2011/12/for-love-of-horses.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+griggsdakota%2FdtCX+%28Griggs+Dakota%29

and

http://networkedblogs.com/rNGVY

The above are a couple of informative articles related to horse slaughter.

And let us become fully informed about the drugs used in euthanasia:

http://www.avma.org/issues/animal_welfare/euthanasia.pdf

Pro’s and Con’s

http://sidelinesnews.com/blogs/laurengallops/for-the-love-of-horses-pt-1.html

This link is a fairly thought out portion of the story that leads people to support horse slaughter.  It includes passionate discussion in the comments section as many do, and this is where open minded folks may become more educated overall.  Many of these blog page links that I share have other equally informative articles elsewhere in their blog.

 

Cheval, Anyone?

http://ideas.time.com/2011/12/28/the-case-for-eating-horse-meat/

The above link has some interesting info, especially if you have the stamina to read through the responses!

I want to reiterate that my stand on horse slaughter comes from the viewpoint that I believe it’s inclusion as an industry in the US has value in a “green” world.  It should have merit as part of the cycle of life and making all animals useful.  I don’t believe that euthanasia is a realistic alternative for the majority of horses out there; I don’t expect people to start eating horse meat but also I don’t think the average horse owner keeps a horse all throughout it’s life and plans for how it will eventually end it’s life.   Circumstances are not stable throughout life for most people, incomes fluctuate and why should everyone be expected to spend at least several hundred dollars to dispose of a horse when in fact, EPA does not want you to have to worry about how a horse will be disposed of?….but that info is for another day.

Here’s a copy of an article that I have edited from another source, also discussing horse meat facts:

Four reasons to eat horse meat

From its surprisingly good nutritional values to the arbitrary reasons it was considered “taboo” in the first place, this list gives you a rundown on horse meat

1. Horse Meat is Taboo Thru Tradition, Not Fact

Horse meat has been taboo in the U.S. and U.K. at various points during their history, but they are some of the only countries to do so. In large part, horses are not seen as meat products simply because they have not been used that way.  Horse was commonly eaten throughout pioneering U.S. history and was greatly consumed by all during the years of WWII when there was also an overpopulation of horses left from their discontinued use on farms.

In countries like France, Italy, Belgium, Japan, Spain, horse meat consumption has been widespread for centuries, and is therefore considered a staple or a delicacy.

In fact, one reason why it’s so strange to consider horse flesh as meat may be because the English language has no word to describe it. While pig meat has four terms (pork, bacon, ham and gammon), two for cow (beef, veal) and three for sheep (lamb, mutton and hogget), horse has nothing except the rarely used euphemism “cheval meat” (“cheval” is French for “horse”).

When it comes down to it, everyone who’s a meat eater must ask themselves: why is it acceptable to eat very useful animals like cows (who provide dairy and can be work animals) or intelligent animals like pigs (who are very similar in bone structure and musculature to humans), but somehow wrong to eat horses?   There are lots of people in the world who eat meat protein from innumerable sources; guinna pigs, rabbit, beaver, squirrel……not to mention bear and pronghorn, elk, etc. and birds/fish.

2. Horse Meat (and Slaughter) Has Been Widespread in U.S. Before Now

Even if one doesn’t count the illegal horse slaughter that’s happened in the four years since the practice was banned in the U.S., horse meat hasn’t always been a taboo source of food in America, and has reappeared in American cuisine again and again over the past century.

During World War II, due to beef’s high prices and low supply, some states legalized its sale, and it became a (largely unremarked) staple into the 1950s. A 1951 issue of Time magazine laid it out on the table: “People who used to pretend it was for the dog now came right out and said it was going on the table.”

People even began providing recipes for horse pot roast and equine fillets, a trend that reappeared during the heavy inflation of the mid-1970s.

3. Feeling  ‘Just Wrong Somehow’ Likely Cultural Leftovers

Beyond simply not being used to horse meat, many people oppose horse slaughter (while condoning the slaughter of pigs, sheep and cows) is because it “just feels wrong.” The feeling is likely triggered not by some instinctive moral compass, however.

In fact, it’s likely that many people’s revulsion to eating horse meat comes from the Roman Catholic Church, as far back as the eighth century.  Popes Zachary and Gregory III both instructed St. Boniface, a German missionary, to discourage those he converted from eating horse meat because it was tied to pagan ritual. As Christianity spread, the attempt to stop “heathen” practices eventually morphed into a general religious taboo against horse meat, which has lasted into the present day.

4. Horse Meat Is Both Tasty and Good for You

Here’s the dirty little secret about horse meat: it may be the best “red meat” out there. Though the taste of horse varies, the general consensus is that the meat is tender and sweet, like a blend between beef and venison (deer).

Beyond its taste, however, horse meat is also incredibly good for you, and is USDA-recommended. It’s low in fat, very high in protein, and has double the iron of lean beef and other meats. It also has a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids, which help fight stroke, heart disease and neural degeneration.

If the U.S. government lifts its ban on horse meat and slaughterhouses, it will also open an avenue for the federal government to regulate/test for acceptable levels of possible dangerous chemicals such as “Bute” commonly used as a pain killer in performance horses.  Some people include de-wormer medication use in the argument against consumption of horse meat as well, but studies would likely reveal that horses expel   toxins faster than cattle and other livestock raised for consumption where it’s use (de-wormer) is common, because horses have lower fat body composition and possibly higher metabolism.